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Ateji Gets Ready for the Next Phase …

Despite this being a difficult time to raise money for high tech ventures, Ateji recently concluded a successful round of angel financing with help from Patrick Crehan of CKA.

Patrick is one of the original founders of the company, and over the last three years he has continuously provided assistance to Ateji in terms of:

  • Strategy and financial planning …

  • Recruitment of key staff …

  • Introduction to multi-national client prospects …

  • Provision of intermediate financing …

  • Identification of angel investors …

This finance will enable Ateji to take on key personnel in sales, marketing and development. It will give Ateji the resources it needs to develop a number of commercial, marketing and research partnerships with major IT actors around the world. Patrick continues to advise Ateji as a member of its strategy committee.

Ateji has developed a set of programming language technologies that allow it to efficiently design and develop entirely new domain specific programming languages, also known in the industry as DSLs. These languages are much more efficient than mainstream programming languages and significantly increase the ability of programmers to write clear, correct, easily maintainable code for applications in specific domains such as robotics, engineering, finance, real-time control, data-mining, graphics and games, supercomputing based on massively multi-core systems or clusters, as well as mobile and cloud computing.

Ateji technology also allows it to create new languages by extending existing, well-known languages such as Java, the most popular programming language in the world. By doing this the programmer gets a new language that is much more powerful than usual programming languages, that are not only very easy to learn, but are supported by powerful highly productive industrial strength developer environments such as ECLIPSE.

Users of OptimJ, Ateji’s first major product, regularly report productivity gains of up to 50%. They also report that they can learn to use the language in as little as 15 minutes.

Our latest language product is intended for programming multi-core systems. Most of the current generation of microprocessors are based on 2-, 4-, 6-core architectures, allowing a chip to do 2, 4 or 6 things at the same time. Tilera recently released a 100-core processor and companies such as Intel are busy with plans for massively multi-core systems that can do as many as 1000 different tasks simultaneously. Multi-core systems are an important part of the future of computing. They enable chip-makers to continue extending Moore’s law. They will play an increasingly important role in helping to manage the energy consumption of computationally intensive systems. Existing solutions and workarounds are reasonable good when applied to 2-, 4- or 8-core systems, but quickly fail to scale when the number of cores goes beyond about 16.

The problem is essentially a language problem in that most programming languages simply do not express parallelism. As a result programmers have no way of telling the machines how to ‘coordinate’ the many tasks they should be doing at once. Mainstream programming languages do not even allow programmer to ‘tell’ the machine that certain tasks can be carried out simultaneously on as many cores as are available, and that certain others must be done in strict sequence to avoid catastrophic error. The languages that do allow programmer to do this are more difficult to learn, and have limited support in terms of tools for development. Ateji provides a solution to this problem in terms of an extension to Java 5.0 that allows the programmer to tell the machine how different tasks need to be coordinated, to be carried out effectively, in a very simple and intuitive way. Mainstream programmers, for example those without a PhD in parallel programming are able to learn the systems an write correct code for multi-core systems in as little as 15 minutes.

The product should be available for general release in May 2010. Anyone interested can look for more details here or contact Patrick Viry for more information.

 
     

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